Abstracts 2011

December

02.12.11 (Friday)
12:00
"The Sun-as-a-star spectrum in the Extreme UltraViolet"
Vincenzo ANDRETTA (Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Italy)
Abstract
05.12.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Complementarity between VLTI and ALMA in the studies of planet forming regions"
Olja PANIC (ESO, Garching)
Abstract
06.12.11 (Tuesday)
16:00
"Improving the extragalactic distance scale with stellar distance indicators: The Araucaria Project"
Wolfgang GIEREN (Universidad de Concepcion)
Abstract
07.12.11 (Wednesday)
12:00
"High precision photometry of exoplanet transits and occultations"
Monika LENDL (Universite de Geneve)
Abstract
07.12.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Core-Collapse Supernova Progenitors"
Schuyler VAN DYK (IPAC/Caltech & ESO Visiting Scientist)
Abstract
09.12.11 (Friday)
12:00
"A Possible New Combined AGN/Starburst Population"
Kate HUSBAND (University of Bristol)
Abstract
13.12.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"On the Progenitors of Local Type Ia Supernovae"
Ashley PAGNOTTA (Louisiana State University)
Abstract
14.12.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Ultra-compact dwarf galaxies"
Steffen MIESKE (ESO, Chile)
Abstract
15.12.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Infrared excess and extended emission around Cepheids from diffraction-limited 10um imaging with VLT/VISIR"
Alexandre GALLENNE (Observatoire de Paris Meudon)
Abstract
16.12.11 (Friday)
12:00
"The Star Formation Histories and the Stellar Mass Growth of Galaxies between z~8 and z~4"
Valentino GONZALEZ (Lick Observatory)
Abstract

November

04.11.11 (Friday)
12:00
"Globular cluster stars in the Galactic halo"
Sarah MARTELL (ARI, Heidelberg, Germany)
Abstract
07.11.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Wavelength Calibration Surprises on VLT-UVES and Keck-HIRES"
Jonathan WHITMORE (Swinburne University of Technology)
Abstract
09.11.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"The acceleration of the Universe in the light of Supernovae"
Mario HAMUY (Universidad de Chile)
Abstract
16.11.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"The Brown Dwarf Kinematics Project"
Jackie FAHERTY (Universidad de Chile)
Abstract
17.11.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"AGN Feedback in the Cores of Clusters of Galaxies"
Alistair EDGE (Durham University)
Abstract
22.11.11 (Tuesday)
13:00
"Constraining The Formation And Evolution Of Young X-ray Binaries In The Nearest Star-Forming Galaxies"
Vallia ANTONIOU (Iowa State University, Physics & Astronomy Dept.)
Abstract
28.11.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Cool Gaseous Outflows from Star-Forming Galaxies at z ~ 1"
Kate RUBIN (MPIA, Heidelberg)
Abstract
29.11.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Star Formation, Near and Far"
Neal EVANS (University of Texas)
Abstract
30.11.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Lyman Alpha Emitter properties at z=2-3 in MUSYC and VLRS"
Harold FRANCKE (P. Universidad Catolica de Chile)
Abstract

October

3.10.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Clues on the Origins of hot Jupiters"
Amaury TRIAUD (Observatoire de Geneve, Switzerland)
Abstract
6.10.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"The nature of ring galaxies and of their X-ray sources"
Emanuele RIPAMONTI (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy)
Abstract
11.10.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Searches for Metal-Poor Stars from the Hamburg/ESO Survey using the CH G-band"
Vinicius PLACCO (USP, Brazil)
Abstract
12.10.11 (Wednesday)
12:00
"The exoplanets of the SuperWASP all-sky survey"
David ANDERSON (Keele University, UK)
Abstract
12.10.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Astronomical site testing in the era of extremely large telescopes"
Gianluca LOMBARDI (ESO)
Abstract
13.10.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Characterising the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets using narrowband spectrophotometry"
Paul A. WILSON (University of Exeter)
Abstract
20.10.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Galaxy population of SPT-SZ selected galaxy clusters"
Alfredo ZENTENO (Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen)
Abstract
24.10.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Searching for metal-poor stars"
Elisabetta CAFFAU (ZAH, Heidelberg University, Germany)
Abstract
25.10.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"The mass-loss of low-metallicity massive stars"
Frank TRAMPER (University of Amsterdam)
Abstract
26.10.11 (Wednesday)
15:00
"Spectroscopy of Very Low Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in the Lambda Orionis Star Forming Region. I. Enlarging the census down to the planetary mass domain in Collinder 69"
Amelia BAYO (ESO)
Abstract
27.10.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Defocused Photometry to Obtain Accurate Measurements of Transiting Extra-Solar Planets (TEPs)"
Jeremy TREGLOAN-REED (Keele University, UK)
Abstract
28.10.11 (Friday)
12:00
"What polarized X-ray light will tell us about the outflows in active galactic nuclei"
René GOOSMANN (University of Strasbourg)
Abstract
28.10.11 (Friday)
14:00
"Atmospheric Profiling of Low Water Vapour Concentrations and Temperature at ESO’s Paranal Observatory"
Thomas ROSE (Radiometer Physics GmbH, Meckenheim / Germany)
Abstract

September

01.09.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Using Diffuse Interstellar Bands to Probe the Local Diffuse Interstellar Medium"
Mandy BAILEY (Keele University)
Abstract
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"Using Diffuse Interstellar Bands to Probe the Local Diffuse Interstellar Medium"
Mandy BAILEY (Keele University)

Abstract Typically the Interstellar Medium (ISM) conditions are probed via lines arising from neutral or singly-ionized atoms or molecules. This poses a problem with understanding the nature of gas in high temperature environments such as the Local Bubble (LB) and environments of high ultraviolet radiation such as the Disc-Halo interface. To overcome these problems it is necessary to probe the ISM using species that may survive such conditions. This can be achieved using absorption in the so-called Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) whose carriers are large molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Such molecules are thought to be resistant to UV radiation. Observations of DIBs have shown that they are sensitive to their environment with some known to exist in hot, UV-irradiated environments. The ratio of λ5780/ λ5797 equivalent widths is an indicator of the ionization conditions, with a high λ5780/ λ5797 ratio indicating the existence of interfaces between cool/warm hot gas. Observations have shown a high λ5780/ λ5797 ratio in the extra-plannar hot gas in front of ω Centauri which prove the concept and a similar experiment targeting early-type stars in the Magellan Clouds is underway where contributions from the ISM within the Magellanic Clouds can be separated from those originating in the Galactic Halo and Disc. Complementing these projects the NTT at La Silla is being used for a study of high signal-to noise observations of DIBs towards stars in and surrounding the LB. Results from the NTT observations will be used to map the small scale structure in the warm ISM giving an insight into how the conditions change within the LB as traced by the relative strengths of various families of DIBs.
02.09.11 (Friday)
12:00
"UFO: ultra fast objects in the Pleiades field"
Paul ELLIOTT (University of Exeter, UK)
Abstract
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"UFO: ultra fast objects in the Pleiades field"
Paul ELLIOTT (University of Exeter, UK)

Abstract Based on a massive proper motion study of the field of the Pleiades we have identified a sample of very large proper motion candidates.The parent study has still some limitations in terms of contamination that we have been able to characterize with this sample of fast moving candidates. We will present examples of these contaminant.
09.09.11 (Friday)
12:00
"The Spitzer Surveys of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Insights into the Life Cycle of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons"
Karin SANDSTROM (University of California at Berkeley, USA)
Abstract
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"The Spitzer Surveys of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Insights into the Life Cycle of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons"
Karin SANDSTROM (University of California at Berkeley, USA)

Abstract I will present the results of two studies investigating the abundance and physical state of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Observations with ISO and Spitzer have shown that PAHs are deficient in low-metallicity galaxies. In particular, galaxies with 12 + log(O/H) < 8 show mid-infrared spectral energy distributions and spectra consistent with low PAH abundance. The SMC provides a unique opportunity to map the PAH emission in a low-metallicity (12 + log(O/H) ~ 8) galaxy at high spatial resolution and sensitivity to learn about the PAH life-cycle. Using mid- and far-IR photometry from the Spitzer Survey of the SMC (S3MC) and mid-IR spectral mapping from the Spitzer Spectroscopic Survey of the SMC (S4MC) we determine the PAH abundance across the galaxy. We find that the SMC PAH abundance is low compared to the Milky Way and variable, with high abundance in molecular regions and low abundance in the diffuse ISM. From the variations of the mid-IR band strengths, we show that PAHs in the SMC are smaller and more neutral than their counterparts in more metal-rich galaxies. Based on the results of these two studies we propose that PAHs in the SMC are formed with a size distribution shifted towards smaller grains and are therefore easier to destroy under typical diffuse ISM conditions. The distribution of PAH abundance in the SMC suggests that PAH formation in molecular clouds is an important process. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of the PAH life-cycle both at low-metallicity and in the Milky Way.
12.09.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Approaching normal: building the first un-biased sample of DRGs"
Stefan GEIER (Dark Cosmology Centre, Denmark)
Abstract
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"Approaching normal: building the first un-biased sample of DRGs"
Stefan GEIER (Dark Cosmology Centre, Denmark)

Abstract Distant Red Galaxies (DRGs) contain much of the stellar mass at z~2 and are likely the progenitors of the most massive present-day elliptical. Unfortunately, DRGs are very faint in the observed optical, and NIR continuum spectroscopy requires very long exposure times due to the lack of emission lines. Therefore, spectroscopic investigations are currently limited to extremely luminous DRGs, which are atypical representatives. Gravitational lensing by foreground clusters enhances the observed brightness of intrinsically fainter L* DRGs, thus making spectroscopic follow-up feasible. We have an on-going survey to find the rare highly magnified L* DRGs via NIR imaging and to follow them up spectroscopically. In my talk I'm going to describe the current status and prospects of these projects.
14.09.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Megaparsec scale effects on the inner parsecs of galaxies"
Nelson PADILLA (PUC)
PRESENTATION
Abstract
20.09.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"The Star-formation History of the Universe and its Drivers"
David SOBRAL (Royal Observatory, University of Edinburgh, UK)
Abstract
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"The Star-formation History of the Universe and its Drivers"
David SOBRAL (Royal Observatory, University of Edinburgh, UK )

Abstract The High-redshift Emission Line Survey (HiZELS) is exploiting narrow-band filters in the J, H and K bands on WFCAM/UKIRT to undertake deep & wide extragalactic surveys for emission-line galaxies. HiZELS is primarily targeting the redshifted H-alpha emission line at z=0.84 (J), z=1.47(H) and z=2.23(K) over volumes of >10^6 Mpc^3, and, with the addition of a perfectly matched [OII] Subaru narrow-band survey, is resulting in samples of ~1000 high-z emitters at each epoch. By taking advantage of such large and well-defined samples, obtained over the best well-studied fields, we have measured the detailed evolution of the H-alpha (and [OII]) luminosity function and the star formation history of the Universe up to z>2, for the first time. Furthermore, even more importantly, by exploring such large samples and conducting detailed morphological, dust, clustering, environmental and mass studies (and quantifying/identifying key inter-dependences) we have made significant progress in understanding the main drivers of galaxy formation and evolution.
21.09.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"A new Sample of Clusters of Galaxies in the 2dFGRS: Galaxy Population, Dynamical State and Space Distribution"
Luis E. CAMPUSANO (Depto. de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile)
Abstract
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"A new Sample of Clusters of Galaxies in the 2dFGRS: Galaxy Population, Dynamical State and Space Distribution"
Luis E. CAMPUSANO (Depto. de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile)

Abstract We have produced a new sample of clusters derived from the application of a 3-D Voronoi technique focused on the isolation of the systems to 191,440 galaxies belonging to the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), in order to re-examine their variety, frequency and space distribution. The catalog contains 220 clusters automatically identified and having 0.009<0.14,>= 400 km/s and N_g >= 30 and whose member galaxies lie within ~ 1 Abell radius from their centroids, with entries corresponding to all the relevant Abell/APM/EDCC clusters within the 2dF survey and to 95 additional clusters that had not been previously detected. We discuss the characteristics of the new detections and the resulting overall distribution of the massive clusters in the local universe. We produce the first map of the large scale structure (LSS) within the 2dFsurvey to z ~ 0.12 using the minimal spanning tree (MST) using a rich cluster sample. We rediscover the Sloan Great Wall and the two huge superclusters known within the 2dFGRS, one in the NGP at z ~0.08, and the other in the SGP at z ~0.11. We find evidence in the cluster space distribution for one large void at RA 00:30 and 04:00 hrs centered at z ~0.04, which explains a reported deficiency of clusters at z ~ 0.05. The investigated SGP volume is found to be underdense in rich clusters with respect to the NGP volume; the mean underdensity to z ~0.11 is a factor 2.1, which we explain by the presence in the NGP section of an important LSS filament within z < 0.05, a huge supercluster at $z ~0.08, and the role of a huge (cluster) void in the SGP centered at z ~0.09.
22.09.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Galaxy Scale Lenses in the RCS2"
Timo ANGUITA (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile)
Abstract
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"Galaxy Scale Lenses in the RCS2"
Timo ANGUITA (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile)

Abstract Gravitational lensing is one of the most versatile tools in modern extragalactic astrophysics. In particular, strong lensing systems where both lens and source are galaxies can provide insights on several astrophysical questions, such as the bright versus dark matter distribution of lensing galaxies and its evolution as well as the morphological structure and nature of high redshift source galaxies. To carry out these studies, sizable statistical samples of gravitational lenses spanning a large redshift range are required. I will present the first galaxy scale lens catalog from the second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). The catalog contains 60 lensing system candidates composed of Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) lenses at 0.2 < z < 0.6 surrounded by blue arcs or apparent multiple images of background high redshift source galaxies. Besides presenting the catalog along some preliminary results, including mass and mass-to-light ratio estimates for the lensing galaxies, the unique properties given to these candidates by the nature of the RCS2 survey and the search method will be discussed.
26.09.11 (Monday)
11:00
"The complex circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse"
Pierre KERVELLA (Observatoire de Paris, France)
Abstract
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"The complex circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse"
Pierre KERVELLA (Observatoire de Paris)

Abstract The complex circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse Mass-loss occurring in red supergiants (RSGs) is a major contributor to the enrichment of the interstellar medium in dust and molecules. The physical mechanism of this mass loss is however relatively poorly known. Betelgeuse is the nearest RSG, and as such a prime object for high angular resolution observations of its surface by interferometry, and close circumstellar environment using single-pupil instruments. We recently obtained diffraction-limited images of Betelgeuse and a PSF calibrator (Aldebaran) using both NACO and VISIR. The resulting images show an inhomogeneous circumstellar envelope, extending to at least 80 R*. Based on these images, I will briefly discuss our current view of the mass-loss processes occurring in Betelgeuse.
27.09.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Discovery of a high-collimated outflow from Sanduleak's star in the Large Magellanic Cloud"
Rodolfo ANGELONI (Universidad Catolica de Chile)
Abstract
28.09.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"The Milky way, or Galaxy Formation begins at home"
Roberto DE PROPRIS (CTIO)
Abstract
30.09.11 (Friday)
12:00
"The spin-orbit alignment of the Fomalhaut debris disk"
Olivier ABSIL (Liege University)
Abstract


August

02.08.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Fundamental Physical Properties of Young, Low-Mass Objects Derived From the Study of Eclipsing Binaries"
Yilen GOMEZ MAQUEO CHEW (Belfast University)
Abstract
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"Fundamental Physical Properties of Young, Low-Mass Objects Derived From the Study of Eclipsing Binaries"
Yilen GOMEZ MAQUEO CHEW (Belfast University)

Abstract The modelling of multi-epoch, multi-band light curves and radial velocity curves of eclipsing binaries (EBs) allows for the most accurate, direct measurement of the fundamental physical properties of the stars -- masses, radii, temperatures, luminosities. Thus EBs are critical for empirically testing the basic predictions of stellar evolution theory. We present comprehensive analyses of two detached EBs, members of the Orion Nebula Cluster with likely ages around 1 million years. The first of these systems is Parenago 1802, whose eclipsing components are equal in mass (~0.4 Msun). Despite the near-identical masses of the stars, their temperatures and radii differ by 7 % and 9%, respectively. The second system analyzed, 2MASS J05352184-0546085, is to date the only known eclipsing pair in which both components have masses that are below the hydrogen-burning limit. We identify an apparent paradox in the system in which the more massive brown dwarf has a lower surface flux than the less massive. These results establish the fundamental properties of the Pre-Main Sequence stars and brown dwarfs, and challenge our understanding of the processes involved in their formation and early evolutionary stages.
03.08.11 (Wednesday)
12:00
"Mining SDSS in search of multiple populations in globular clusters"
Carmela LARDO (University of Bologna)
Abstract
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"Mining SDSS in search of multiple populations in globular clusters"
Carmela LARDO (Universioty of Bologna)

Abstract Several recent studies have reported the detection of an anomalous color spread along the red giant branch (RGB) of some globular clusters (GC) that appears only when color indices including a near ultraviolet band (such as Johnson U or Strömgren u) are considered. This anomalous spread in color indexes such as U-B or cy has been shown to correlate with variations in the abundances of light elements such as C, N, O, Na, etc., which, in turn, are generally believed to be associated with subsequent star formation episodes that occurred in the earliest few 108 yr of the cluster's life. We used publicly available u, g, r SDSS photometry to search for anomalous u - g spreads in the RGBs of nine Galactic GCs. In seven of them (M 2, M 3, M 5, M 13, M 15, M 92 and M 53), we find evidence of a statistically significant spread in the u - g color, not seen in g - r and not accounted for by observational effects. In the case of M 5, we demonstrate that the observed u - g color spread correlates with the observed abundances of Na, the redder stars being richer in Na than the bluer ones. In all the seven clusters displaying a significant u - g color spread, we find that the stars on the red and blue sides of the RGB, in (g, u - g) color magnitude diagrams, have significantly different radial distributions. In particular, the red stars (generally identified with the second generation of cluster stars, in the current scenario) are always more centrally concentrated than blue stars (generally identified with the first generation) over the range sampled by the data (0.5 rh ⪉ r ⪉ 5 rh), in qualitative agreement with the predictions of some recent models of the formation and chemical evolution of GCs. Our results suggest that the difference in the radial distribution between first and second generation stars may be a general characteristic of GCs.
09.08.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Rosetta's view of an asteroid collision"
Colin SNODGRASS (Max Planck Institute for Solar System studies, Germany)
Abstract
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"Rosetta's view of an asteroid collision"
Colin SNODGRASS (Max Planck Institute for Solar System studies, Germany)

Abstract P/2010 A2 was discovered as a comet, but has subsequently been revealed to be the first observed example of a collision between asteroids. I describe the observations that were performed by the OSIRIS instrument onboard the ESA Rosetta spacecraft and at the 3.6m ESO NTT at La Silla, which were critical in finding the true nature of the object. These observations not only showed that the trail had to be debris from a collision, but also allowed us to find the precise date the collision occurred and constrain the size of the colliding asteroids. The calculation of the total mass of dust produced, and the probability of such a collision, allows us to constrain the total quantity of dust that asteroid collisions add to the zodiacal cloud
10.08.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"BSS in Globular Clusters: chemical abundances and kinematical properties"
Loredana LOVISI (Bologna University)
Abstract
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"BSS in Globular Clusters: chemical abundances and kinematical properties"
Loredana LOVISI (Bologna University)

Abstract Blue stragglers stars (BSS) are brighter and bluer (hotter) than the main sequence (MS) turnoff stars and they mimic a rejuvaneted stellar population in Globular Clusters (GCs). From their position in the colour-magnitude diagram and from direct measurements, they are known to be more massive than the normal MS stars, thus indicating that some process able to increase the initial mass of single stars must be at work. Two main scenarios have been proposed to explain their formation: BSS could be the end-products of stellar mergers induced by collisions, or they may form by the mass-transfer activity between two companions in a binary system, possibly up to the complete coalescence of the two stars. Hydrodynamic simulations suggest different chemical patterns (in particular carbon and oxygen abundances) for BSS formed through the two different mechanisms. Possibly also different kinematical properties (like rotational velocity) are linked to the two formation mechanisms. In this framework, I am conducting an extensive survey of surface abundances and kinematical properties for a representative number of BSS in a selected sample of GCs, by using the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory. In this talk I will discuss the main results concerning the BSS population in the GCs 47 Tucanae, M4 and NGC 6397.
16.08.11 (Tuesday)
11:30
"Transit spectroscopy of exoplanet host stars"
Uwe WOLTER (Hamburger Sternwarte)
Abstract
17.08.11 (Wednesday)
12:00
"Archaeology of Exoterrestrial Planetary Systems"
Jay FARIHI (University of Leicester)
Abstract
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"Archaeology of Exoterrestrial Planetary Systems"
Jay FARIHI (University of Leicester)

Abstract The last several years has brought about a dynamic shift in the view of exoplanetary systems in the post-main sequence, perhaps epitomized by the evidence for surviving rocky planetary bodies at white dwarfs. Coinciding with the launch of Spitzer, both space- and ground-based data have supported a picture whereby asteroid analogs persist at a significant fraction of cool white dwarfs, and are prone to tidal disruption when passing close to the compact stellar remnant. The ensuing debris can produce a detectable infrared excess, and the material gradually falls onto the star, polluting the atmosphere with heavy elements that can be used to determine the bulk composition of the destroyed planetary body. Based on the observations to date, the parent bodies inferred at white dwarfs are best described as asteroids, and have a distinctly rocky composition similar to material found in the inner Solar System. Their minimum masses are typical of large asteroids, and can approach or exceed the mass of Vesta and Ceres, the two largest asteroids in the Solar System. From the number of stars surveyed in various studies, the fraction of white dwarfs that host terrestrial planetary system remnants is at least a few percent, but likely to be in the range 20-30%. Therefore, A- and F-type stars form terrestrial planets efficiently, with a frequency at least as high as the remnants detected at their white dwarf descendants.
17.08.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"The fundamental parameters of delta Vel"
Antoine MERAND (ESO)
Abstract
18.08.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Reducing imaging data with THELI - a demonstration"
Mischa SCHIRMER (CTIO)
Abstract
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"Reducing imaging data with THELI - a demonstration"
Mischa SCHIRMER (CTIO)

Abstract The THELI reduction pipeline has been used by the ESO PR office for many press photo releases over the last few years, taking advantage of the high automatisation level and advanced processing schemes. Using a live data reduction of some ESO data, I will introduce you to THELI and its possibilities of producing optical and near-IR science-grade data. My presentation will concentrate on the main features and usage only, so that there is time left for discussion.
19.08.11 (Friday)
12:00
"The Mechanisms Driving the Evolution and Dispersal of Protoplanetary Discs"
Ilaria PASCUCCI (LPL, Arizona)
Abstract
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"The Mechanisms Driving the Evolution and Dispersal of Protoplanetary Discs"
Ilaria PASCUCCI (LPL, Arizona)

Abstract Circumstellar disks are a natural outcome of the star formation process and the birthplace of planetary systems. The time scale over which they disperse and the physical mechanisms driving their dispersal are key to understanding the types of planets that can form. First, I will show that the two most known disk dispersal mechanisms, viscous accretion and planet formation, cannot alone explain the properties of protoplanetary disks. I will then present the results from our VLT/VISIR runs providing the first strong evidence for an additional disk dispersal mechanism: photoevaporation of disk gas driven by high-energy photons from the central star. I will discuss what additional measurements are needed to pin down photoevaporation rates and the impact of star-driven photoevaporation on the formation of giant and terrestrial planets.
22.08.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Is the Universe at z < 0.1 Underdense?"
Ryan KEENAN (Fulbright Fellow, CTIO)
Abstract
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"Is the Universe at z < 0.1 Underdense?"
Ryan KEENAN (Fulbright Fellow, CTIO)

Abstract The size of large-scale structures in the local universe (e.g. sheets, voids, and superclusters of galaxies), and our location among them, is of critical importance to the interpretation of observational results. Cosmic variance due to large-scale structure can lead to systematic variations in observational data. Such sytematics can dominate over other sources of error if a cosmological volume suffient to average over cosmic variance has not been sampled. However, it remains unclear just what the typical size of large-scale structure is, and hence what volume constitutes a representitive sample of the universe. If local large-scale structures are much greater than 100 Mpc in size, then local measurements of the Hubble constant, and other observables such as the stellar mass and luminosity density of the universe, could still harbor large systematic errors. It has been shown recently, for example, that if we live near the center of a large underdensity (radius ~250 Mpc, z < 0.1) that is ~50% less dense than its surroundings, then we would measure the apparent acceleration of the expansion of the universe even when no dark energy is present (Alexander et al. 2009, Bolejko et al. 2010). I will discuss my work regarding near-infrared galaxy counts and luminosity functions to test for the existence of such a large local void.
25.08.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Corona regions of open star clusters"
Anton F. SELEZNEV (Ural State University)
Abstract
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"Is the Universe at z < 0.1 Underdense?"
Anton F. SELEZNEV (Ural State University)

Abstract Corona (halo) regions of open star clusters play important role in cluster dynamics. The lecture includes brief history of cluster coronae detection and brief description of classic works. It is shown first results of density distribution study in the halo of open cluster models. It is shown also possibility of cluster halo detection with star counts using stars selected by color-magnitude diagram and diagram "Q parameter - color index".
29.08.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Foreground removal from WMAP 7yr temperature and polarization maps using an MLP neural network"
H.-U. NOERGAARD-NIELSEN (DTU Space Agency, Denmark)
Abstract
31.08.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Off-axis variability of AGNs: A new paradigm for broad-line- and continuum-emitting regions"
Martin GASKELL (Universidad de Valparaiso)
Abstract

July

04.07.11 (Monday)
11:00
"(Re)solving carbon-rich AGB stars using high angular resolution technique"
Claudia PALADINI (Wien University)
Abstract
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"(Re)solving carbon-rich AGB stars using high angular resolution technique"
Claudia PALADINI (Wien university)

Abstract In this talk I will present our recent results obtained applying the high angular resolution technique for investigating the atmosphere of C-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars (AGB). Luminous carbon rich stars are evolved objects characterized by dynamic processes like pulsation, dust formation and mass-loss. These stars are fundamental for the chemical enrichment of the ISM, and the chemical evolution of galaxies. I will show the interpretation of interferometric observations based on state-of-art static and dynamic models. The stellar parameters derived for mildly pulsating C-rich stars by combining spectroscopy and interferometry will be discussed and compared with stellar evolutionary models. In spite of these recent encouraging results, several questions are still open, in particular concerning dust formation and mass-loss process. In the final part of the talk I will address to some of those questions and I will illustrate how synergy between interferometry and the new generation facilities (ESO/MATISSE, Gaia, HERSCHEL..) will help to disentangle them.
05.07.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Direct imaging for the next decades with a hypertelescope to probe hydrodynamic stellar surface structures"
Fabien PATRU (ESO)
Abstract
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"Direct imaging for the next decades with a hypertelescope to probe hydrodynamic stellar surface structures"
Fabien PATRU (ESO)

Abstract A hypertelescope can provide direct snapshot images of complex astrophysical objects with both high contrast and high angular resolution capabilities. The hypertelescope concept is suitable either with a single-dish telescope coupled with an adaptive optique and a "dense aperture mask (DAM)", or with a large optical interferometer coupled with a fringe tracker and a "pupil densifier" to combine the beams. First, it is shown how the technical design of a hypertelescope (entrance pupil configuration, imaging system) is directly related to the science case specifications (spatial resolution, field of view, contrast). Then, an example is given with simulated images of the photosphere of Betelgeuse, to discuss the new scientific insights expected with a hypertelescope facility.
07.07.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"T Pyx: a brilliant mystery"
Alessandro EDEROCLITE (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias)
Abstract
12.07.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Can we trust CO emission as a probe of the densities and temperatures of molecular clouds?"
Faviola MOLINA (Heidelberg University, Germanyl)
Abstract
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"Can we trust CO emission as a probe of the densities and temperatures of molecular clouds?"
Faviola MOLINA (Heidelberg University, Germany)

Abstract I will show the analysis performed in a large suite of simulated molecular clouds to get the distributions of CO and gas temperature. In this work, we also derived brightness and excitation temperature from synthetic CO(1-0) maps, in order to help us understand how to interpret CO line emission from real molecular clouds. The simulations were performed using a fully dynamical 3D model of magnetized turbulence coupled to a chemical network simplified to follow the dominant pathways for CO formation and destruction. We find that most of the CO is located at densities over 10^3 cm^-3 where the temperature is roughly 10-40 K independently of the mean density, metallicity and UV field strength. Although most of the volume is in warmer and less dense regions, CO photodissociation is more efficient there making the CO abundance small. It follows that CO observations alone give a misleading view of the physical conditions in the clouds.
13.07.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Mass-loss from evolved stars: effect of metallicity and binarity"
Eric LAGADEC (ESO)
Abstract
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"Mass-loss from evolved stars: effect of metallicity and binarity"
Eric LAGADEC (ESO)

Abstract Mass-loss from evolved stars is very important for stellar evolutionand for the chemical evolution of galaxies. I will show how infrared observations can help understanding the effect of metallicity on this mass-loss and how binarity affect the morphology of evolved stars during the transition between the AGB and planetary nebulae phases.
14.07.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Modelling the dynamic evolution of Be star disks"
Xavier HAUBOIS (University of Sao Paulo, Brazil)
Abstract
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"Modelling the dynamic evolution of Be star disks"
Xavier HAUBOIS (University of Sao Paulo, Brazil)

Abstract Circumstellar disks of Be stars, that are formed from matter ejected from the central star, are governed by a very rich physics in which viscosity plays an important role and that could have much in common to other objects such as active galactic nuclei for example. Our group have developed state-of-the-art theoretical tools to analyse the dynamical behaviour of a Be disk fed by non-constant decretion rates. They are mainly based on the computer code HDUST, a fully three-dimensional radiative transfer code that has been succesfully applied to study several Be systems so far. In this talk, I will present different decretion disk models computed for different dynamical scenarios (basically for different mass loss scenarios). Then we will see how we can have a clue on the dynamical status of a Be star by looking at some specific observables.
19.07.11 (Tuesday)
11:00
"The Scutum-Crux Complex: Tying massive stellar formation with the overall structure of the Milky Way"
Carlos GONZALEZ (Universidad de Alicante)
Abstract
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"T Pyxidis: optical and near-infrared behaviour at maximum light"
Carlos GONZALEZ (Universidad de Alicante)

Abstract With the discovery of several massive, young clusters in the last five years, the area around the base of the Scutum-Crux arm (around l=28) has become one of the more intense stellar formation areas in the whole Galaxy. This is not totally unexpected, as it is just there where it was predicted that the long bar of the Milky Way would come into contact with the disk, triggering stellar formation. With this talk we review all these evidences and we bring others into light, as we try to obtain a clearer picture of what is happening in these areas and what does it tell us about the inner structure of the Galaxy, particularly of the bulge+bar complex.
26.07.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"SINFONI-LGS observations of the multiple Trans-Neptunian system (136108) Haumea"
Christophe DUMAS (ESO)
Abstract
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"SINFONI-LGS observations of the multiple Trans-Neptunian system (136108) Haumea"
Christophe DUMAS (ESO)

Abstract I'll report on high-contrast VLT data used to (i) characterize the surface properties (chemistry/physical state) of Haumea and its moons and (ii) explore the possible source of heating to maintain water ice in its crystalline state over the multiple components of the Haumea system.
28.07.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Hot stars in Brno - First decade of research"
Jan JANIK (Masaryk University, Czech Republic)
Abstract
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"Hot stars in Brno - First decade of research"
Jan JANIK (Masaryk University, Czech Republic)

Abstract More than 10 year is in Brno group of Astrophysicists which is focused onstudy of hot stars. In my talk I would like to introducewhy we like mainly these stars, our results on this field from point of viewof theoretical and also observational results. I will show examplesof exploring stars and our next interesting targets and also problems notsolved yet.


June

01.06.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"The VVV Survey Rocks"
Dante MINNITI (PUC, Chile)
Abstract
03.06.11 (Friday)
12:00
"X-shooter Observations of QSO Pairs"
Guido CUPANI (INAF Trieste, Italy)
Abstract
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"X-shooter Observations of QSO Pairs"
Guido CUPANI (INAF Trieste, Italy)

Abstract The analysis of the spectra of QSOs lying at a small angular separation (~1-10 arcmin) is a promising way to investigate the properties of the IGM in 3D and to set constraint on cosmology via the so-called Alcock-Paczynski test. In this talk, I provide a general introduction to the topic and describe the current state of the observational program carried out by our group in Trieste. I mainly focus on observations carried out with the X-shooter spectrograph, discussing some preliminary results obtained from the spectral analysis of a handful of QSO pairs at redshift ~2-3. I will also report on the unexpected discovery that a purported QSO pair included in the Véron-Cetty & Véron (2006) catalogue is actually a QSO-star pair.
06.06.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Infrared Observations of Hot Exo-Zodiacal Dust"
Bertrand MENNESSON (JPL)
Abstract
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"The VVV Survey Rocks"
Bertrand MENNESSON (JPL)

Abstract Debris disks found around main sequence stars are supposed to be the remnants of planetary formation. The outer colder parts of these disks, analogous to our solar system Kuiper belt, were first detected via their mid-infrared excess emission and then abundantly imaged at visible to sub-millimeter wavelengths. Structures and asymmetries in these spatially resolved debris disks have been used to infer the presence of yet unseen planets. The power of this technique was recently demonstrated with the direct imaging of massive planets at the inner edge of warped extended dust disks previously detected around the nearby A stars beta Pictoris and Fomalhaut. Conversely, very little is known about the warmer dust component of circumstellar debris disks, similar to the zodiacal material found in the inner solar system. A few hot debris disks have been found by Spitzer around mature stars via excess emission at 24 microns. But surprisingly, the majority of the hot debris disk detections has come from the ground, where infrared interferometric observations have recently revealed small (~1%) resolved excesses around a dozen nearby main sequence stars. We will discuss here some of these hot disks detections (recently obtained with the Keck and CHARA interferometer), and discuss their implications in terms of dust characteristics and dynamical origin. If bright exozodiacal disks result from transient brightening (by a factor up to 10000 in the infrared) similar to that inferred during the solar system Late Heavy Bombardment, their detections could trace the presence of outer planets scattering numerous comets in the inner circumstellar environment. Hot exo-zodiacal disks may then be the signposts of massive exoplanets, just like the large asymmetries previously detected in the colder outer parts of debris disks
07.06.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Bipolar PNe and their binary central stars - the kinematics and binary shaping of HaTr 4"
Amy TYNDALL (Manchester Jodrell Bank, ING)
Abstract
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"Bipolar PNe and their binary central stars - the kinematics and binary shaping of HaTr 4"
Amy TYNDALL (Manchester Jodrell Bank, ING)

Abstract The formation of spherically shaped planetary nebulae (PNe) is generally very well understood in terms of a single star progenitor, but any deviations from sphericity - specifically bipolarity - are somewhat of a mystery. A major contender to explain the formation of these aspherical nebulae is binarity in the central star system; however, there is little past observational research fully exploring this possibility, despite the theory itself being more than 30 years old. Detailed analyses of the morphology and kinematics of PNe are required to fully ascertain any relationship between binarity of the central star system and nebular shaping. Very few of the known binary central star PNe have been analysed in such a way, but of those that have the results have been encouraging. In this talk, I will introduce some of the theory about the role of binary stars in the formation of planetary nebulae and present a morpho-kinematical analysis of one such PN - HaTr 4 - performed using VLT-UVES longslit spectra.
08.06.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"High contrast imaging of extra-solar planetary systems"
Dimitri MAWET (ESO)
Abstract
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"High contrast imaging of extra-solar planetary systems"
Dimitri MAWET (ESO)

Abstract I will present the current scientific and technical state of high contrast imaging of exoplanets, discussing the recent discoveries around HR8799, Beta Pictoris, and Fomalhaut. After reviewing the ingredients necessary to build and operate an efficient coronagraph, I will focus on the promises of the upcoming wave of extreme adaptive optics instruments planned for many major observatories (SPHERE on the VLT, GPI on Gemini, P3K at Palomar, HICIAO at Subaru), and the long-term prospects of ELTs and space-based coronagraphs.
13.06.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Young Planets at Solar-System Scales"
Michael IRELAND (Macquarie University, Australia)
Abstract
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"Young Planets at Solar-System Scales"
Michael IRELAND (Macquarie University, Australia)

Abstract The transit photometry and radial velocity techniques have given us a vast sample of extrasolar planets from which to study the extrasolar planet zoo at old ages and the chaos involved in multiple planetary systems. We now understand that the properties of this zoo are determined by planetary migration. Imaging with adaptive optics on arcsecond scales has enabled us to image the planetary freaks at large separations, which may form via a different mechanism to "normal" planets. However, the separation range or 5-10 AU where core-accretion planets are expected to form is largely not probed by current techniques. I will outline efforts to detect planets and brown dwarfs in this zone around both solar-type and intermediate mass stars, using the unique SAM mode on NACO, as well as current and future supporting observations with Keck, the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Gemini Planet Imager.
14.06.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Young massive stellar clusters in the Milky Way: tips and tricks"
Maria MESSINEO (MPIfR, Bonn)
Abstract
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"Young massive stellar clusters in the Milky Way: tips and tricks"
Maria MESSINEO (MPIfR, Bonn)

Abstract The recent 2MASS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE surveys have revealed over a thousand candidate stellar clusters, which are hidden behind copious amounts of dust and gas in the Galactic plane. By combining multi-wavelength photometric information (near-, mid-infrared, radio and X data), it is possible to select new candidate massive clusters, by identifying their candidate massive members. Only a dozen massive (> 10^4 Msun) stellar clusters are currently known in the Milky Way. I will present a multi-wavelength analysis of newly discovered young massive clusters, and unveil their massive stellar content. The clusters GLIMPSE9 and Cl1813-178 are part of two giant molecular clouds, which are extremely rich of HII regions and SNRs. We have undertaken a search of massive stars over the whole region, and first SINFONI observations reveal a spread population of massive stars.
15.06.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"The number density and mass density of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at 0.4 < z < 2.2"
Gabriel BRAMMER (ESO)
Abstract
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"The number density and mass density of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at 0.4 < z < 2.2"
Gabriel BRAMMER (ESO)

Abstract We study the build-up of the bimodal galaxy population using the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey, which provides excellent redshifts and well-sampled spectral energy distributions of ~27,000 galaxies with K<22.8 at 0.4 < z < 2.2. We first show that star-forming galaxies and quiescent galaxies can be robustly separated with a two-color criterion over this entire redshift range. We then study the evolution of the number density and mass density of quiescent and star-forming galaxies, extending the results of the COMBO-17, DEEP2, and other surveys to z=2.2. The mass density of quiescent galaxies with M > 3 10^11 solar masses increases by a factor of ~10 from z=2 to the present day, whereas the mass density in star-forming galaxies is flat or decreases over the same time period. Modest mass growth by a factor of 2 of individual quiescent galaxies can explain roughly half of the strong density evolution at M>10^11 solar masses, due to the steepness of the exponential tail of the mass function. The rest of the density evolution of massive, quiescent galaxies is likely due to transformation (e.g. quenching) of the massive star-forming population, a conclusion which is consistent with the density evolution we observe for the star-forming galaxies themselves, which is flat or decreasing with cosmic time. Modest mass growth does not explain the evolution of less massive quiescent galaxies (~10^10.5 solar masses), which show a similarly steep increase in their number densities. The less massive quiescent galaxies are therefore continuously formed by transforming galaxies from the star-forming population.
22.06.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Secular Evolution and Structural Properties of Stellar Bars in Galaxies"
Dimitri GADOTTI (ESO)
Abstract
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"Secular Evolution and Structural Properties of Stellar Bars in Galaxies"
Dimitri GADOTTI (ESO)

Abstract Bars are major drivers of galaxy evolution. In order to understand how bars shape the observed properties of galaxies we need an understanding, as complete as possible, of their actual structural properties, which can be compared to galaxy evolution models and to galaxies at higher redshifts. In this work, I present results from the modeling of stellar bars in nearly 300 barred galaxies in the local universe through parametric multi-component multi-band image fitting. Parameters such as bar effective radius, ellipticity, boxiness, length and mass, and bar-to-total luminosity and mass ratios, are determined, which is unprecedented for a sample of this size. The properties of bars in galaxies with classical bulges and pseudo-bulges are compared. For a fixed bar-to-total mass ratio, pseudo-bulges are on average significantly less massive than classical bulges, indicating that, if pseudo-bulges are formed through bars, further processes are necessary to build a classical bulge. I find a number of correlations between various bar structural parameters, and show that these correlations can arise if bars grow longer and more eccentric with dynamical age, as a result of angular momentum exchange from the inner to the outer parts of galaxies. A plausible consequence is that bar pattern speeds should become lower with bar dynamical age, and towards galaxies with more prominent bulges.
23.06.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"Chemical tagging of multiple stellar generations in globular clusters"
Angela BRAGAGLIA (INAF, Bologna Observatory)
Abstract
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"Chemical tagging of multiple stellar generations in globular clusters"
Angela BRAGAGLIA (INAF, Bologna observatory)

Abstract Globular clusters have recently been shown to host at least two stellar generations. Evidence from photometry is mounting, but the firmer confirmation of this comes from high-resolution spectroscopy. In particular, from our extensive FLAMES survey of Galactic GCs we know that a bona fide GC *must* show the Na-O anticorrelation, signature of the cohexistence of multiple stellar generations. I will present further progresses in the chemical tagging of multiple stellar populations in GCs using the full set of proton-capture elements (e.g. Mg, Al, Si). I will focus in particular on some notable cases, like NGC1851 and NGC6752. I will also discuss the "interaction" with photometry, which is very time-efficient compared to high-resolution spectroscopy, and the different combinations of colours and indices useful to separate different populations in GCs, once calibrated with comparison to spectroscopic results.
23.06.11 (Thursday)
16:00
"Follow-up observations of CoRoT planetary candidates: the road to the newest family members!"
D. GANDOLFI (ESTEC/ESA)
Abstract
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"Follow-up observations of CoRoT planetary candidates: the road to the newest family members!"
D. GANDOLFI (ESTEC/ESA)

Abstract Transiting extrasolar planets are cornerstones for understanding the nature of planets beyond the Solar System since a wealth of precious information can be gained. The CoRoT satellite is the first space mission devoted to the discovery of extrasolar planets and it has been in continuous operation for more than four years. Although the superb photometric accuracy achieved by CoRoT allows us to detect transiting super-earths down to ~2 Earth radii, each CoRoT candidate must go through an intensive ground-based follow-up chain to distinguish the genuine transiting planets from the much more common false positives. In this talk I will briefly describe the photometric and spectroscopic methods used by the CoRoT team to assess the planetary nature of its transiting candidates and present the newest CoRoT exoplanet harvest.
24.06.11 (Friday)
12:00
"Tracing the Perseus arm overdensity and kinematic perturbation in the anticenter direction"
Maria MONGUIO (Universitat de Barcelona)
Abstract
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"Tracing the Perseus arm overdensity and kinematic perturbation in the anticenter direction"
Maria MONGUIO (Universitat de Barcelona)

Abstract We are working on a two step approach to provide new insights on the outer spiral arm pattern of the Milky Way: 1) a deep Strömgren photometric survey (8 square degrees) to map the stellar space density of moderate young B5-A3 type stars tracing the Perseus arm, and 2) a spectroscopic survey to determine the velocity perturbation due to the density wave through accurate radial velocities. First reduced preliminary data suggest an overdensity around 1.5-2kpc, probably associated with the Perseus arm. Results from this project will present a significant step towards mapping the spiral structure between the second and the third galactic quadrant, where the determination of kinematic distances is not possible. In addition, the obtained photometric survey will be used to detect F supergiants up to the disk cut-off and to trace the 3D extinction in this direction.
28.06.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Probing the Helium Enrichment of the Galactic Bulge with the Red Giant Branch Bump"
David NATAF (Ohio State University)
Abstract
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"Probing the Helium Enrichment of the Galactic Bulge with the Red Giant Branch Bump"
David NATAF (Ohio State University)

Abstract I discuss ongoing measurements of the red giant branch bump in globular clusters and the Galactic bulge, as well as comparisons with models, and how these measurements can be combined with stellar models to yield a unique probe of the age-metallicity-helium relationship in the bulge. Using the OGLE-III bulge photometric survey, we find that the bulge RGBB may indicate a much higher level of helum enrichment than that observed in globular clusters, closer to Y~0.35 than Y~0.27 for stars at solar metallicity.

May

02.05.11 (Monday)
11:00
"The emergence of the Hubble sequence"
Dr. Stijn WUYTS (MPE)
Abstract
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"The emergence of the Hubble sequence"
Dr. Stijn WUYTS (MPE)

Abstract I will present progress in our understanding of the relation between the structure and stellar populations of galaxies in the young universe, and its evolution to the present day. To this end, we combine deep data from recent and ongoing surveys, such as PEP with Herschel, and CANDELS with HST. In addition, hydrodynamical simulations coupled to radiative transfer shed light on the nature of both star-forming and quiescent galaxies in the young universe, and the connection between them.
03.05.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Doughnuts for lunch! - Studying AGN tori with MIDI"
Dr. Konrad TRISTRAM (MPfR, Bonn)
Abstract
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"Doughnuts for lunch! - Studying AGN tori with MIDI"
Dr. Konrad TRISTRAM (MPfR, Bonn)

Abstract A torus of molecular gas and dust is one of the key components of unified schemes of active galactic nuclei (AGN): this "doughnut" provides the material for accretion onto the supermassive black hole and is held responsible for the orientation-dependent obscuration of the central engine. I will present the results and the current status of observations of these dust distributions with the MIDI interferometer at the VLTI. MIDI studies of AGN are a great success with more than 20 AGN successfully observed interferometrically. I will especially focus on the results for NGC 1068 and the Circinus galaxy, the two closest Seyfert 2 galaxies. They are the best studied objects and their nuclei are well resolved. Hence a precise determination of the properties of the individual dust components can be obtained, showing that the individual dust distributions are more complex than simple "doughnuts". Furthermore, the interferometric observations of a number of sources show that the warm body of the torus scales with the square root of the luminosity of the AGN. Comparing this relation to a similar one for the inner torus edge, we find that the warm dust in the body of the torus is located at about 30 times larger radii than the inner hot rim. The large scatter about the size-luminosity relation in the mid-infrared hints at significant differences between the tori in individual galaxies.
05.05.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"The Scutum Complex and star formation in the inner Milky Way"
Dr. Ignacio NEGUERUELA (Universidad de Alicante)
Abstract
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"The Scutum Complex and star formation in the inner Milky Way"
Dr. Ignacio NEGUERUELA (Universidad de Alicante)

Abstract The structure of the inner Milky Way is still very poorly known, in spite of major recent advances. The recent discovery of several clusters of red supergiants, estimated to be amongst the most massive young clusters in the Galaxy, in the Scutum region offers a new window into this topic. I will present the results of our spectroscopic surveys, showing that these clusters are part of huge star-forming structures, with implied masses of several 10^5Msun in stars each. Combined with recent HII region surveys, these results highlight the existence of prominent starburst regions towards Galactic longitude l=24-30. I will discuss several possible interpretations of the observations and their implications for Galactic structure.
10.05.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Multiplicity-study of nearby B-type Stars using near-infrared data from ESO-VLT Archive"
Christian ADAM (Jena University)
Abstract
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"Multiplicity-study of nearby B-type Stars using near-infrared data from ESO-VLT Archive"
Christian ADAM (Jena University)

Abstract It is still not clear, whether intermediate/high mass stars form preferentially by coagulation of lower-mass stars or through accretion via a massive circumstellar disk. A crucial parameter to solve this issue, is the multiplicity of high mass stars. While many B-type stars are known to be multiple, also many of them had not been studied before (by AO imaging) whether they are close multiples. I have reduced all archived VLT/NACO data of B-type stars within 1 kpc and want to present the preliminary results of my studies.
11.05.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"SONYC: "Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters""
Koraljka MUZIC (University of Toronto)
Abstract
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"SONYC: "Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters""
Koraljka MUZIC (University of Toronto)

Abstract Star forming regions harbor a large population of free-floating objects below the stellar-mass boundary. These objects include brown dwarfs, but also a population of objects with masses comparable to those of massive planets, often referred to as planemos. SONYC, "Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters", is an ongoing project to provide a complete census of the substellar population in nearby young clusters. The survey relies on extremely deep wide-field optical and near-infrared imaging, with the follow-up spectroscopy. With the use of the facilities such as Subaru, VLT, Gemini, CTIO, NTT and Spitzer, we aim to probe the bottom end of the IMF to unprecedented levels. In this talk, I will discuss the current state of knowledge and the main issues in the studies of the IMF at the low-mass end. I will report on the current status of the SONYC survey and present our results on NGC 1333, Rho Ophiuchus, and Chamaeleon-I. I will also present our future plans and discuss the currently used observing strategies. Finally, I will address the completeness of the current brown dwarf census in young clusters and the implications of our findings for star formation theory.=====
12.05.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"V838 Monocerotis and the New Class of Intermediate-Luminosity Red Transients"
Howard BOND (STScI, Baltimore, USA)
Abstract
16.05.11 (Monday)
12:00
"Gaseous Halos of Spiral Galaxies and the Interstellar Disk-Halo Connection"
Ralf-Juergen DETTMAR (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany)
Abstract
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"Gaseous Halos of Spiral Galaxies and the Interstellar Disk-Halo Connection"
Ralf-Juergen DETTMAR (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Germany)

Abstract Multi-wavelength studies of edge-on disk galaxies show the presence of various phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic halos. This includes ionized gas, the hot medium, as well as the cosmic ray component coupled to large scale magnetic fields. The properties of these ISM components in halos are discussed in the framework of the disk-halo interaction, the large scale circulation of matter in a supernova driven ISM.
18.05.11 (Wednesday)
16:00
"Precise radial velocities of detached eclipsing binaries. How to kill two birds with one stone?"
Krzysztof HELMINIAK (PUC, Chile)
Abstract
19.05.11 (Thursday)
12:00
"What can hydrated minerals tell us about aqueous activity on early Mars?"
John CARTER (IAS - Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud)
Abstract
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"What can hydrated minerals tell us about aqueous activity on early Mars?"
John CARTER (IAS - Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud)

Abstract Mars once was geologically active with complex surface and sub-surface hydrological systems, which might have been conducive to the development of organics. Spaceborne, near-infrared imaging spectrometers are providing us with ample evidence for past aqueous activity as recorded in the surface mineralogy and morphology. We investigate hydrated mineral-bearing exposures on Mars in the hopes of better constraining both the habitability potential of early wet environments as well as the planet's global geological evolution.

31.05.11 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Studies of extrasolar planets from space photometry"
Sergio ORTOLANI (Universita' di Padova)
Abstract


April

April 4, 12:00 hr: Dr. Pedro LACERDA
The extraordinary dwarf planet Haumea

April 5, 12:00 hr: Dr. Bringfried STECKLUM (Thueringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Germany)
Verification of protostellar outflows in GLIMPSE

April 6, 16:00 hr: Dr. Norbert PRZYBILLA (University of Erlangen-Nueremberg, Germany)
Massive Stars as Tracers for Stellar and Galactochemical Evolution
PRESENTATION

April 12, 12:00 hr: Dr. Duncan Forbes (Swinburne University of Tecnology, Australia)
What is a Galaxy?

April 13, 16:00 hr: Dr. Gary S. DA COSTA (Mt Stromlo Observatory, Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Australian National University)
The Dynamics of the Outskirts of Omega Centauri

April 14, 16:00 hr: Dr. Duncan FORBES (Swinburne University of Technology, Australia)
Galaxy Halos : Here Be Dragons

April 18, 12:00 hr: Dr. Beate STELZER (INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo)
A comprehensive X-Shooter survey in nearby star forming regions

April 19, 12:00 hr: Dr. S. HOENIG (UCSB Dept. of Physics, Santa Barbara, CA)
The dusty heart of active galaxies -- recent results from VLT, VLTI, and the Keck interferometer

April 20, 16:00 hr: Dr. Francois BOULANGER (Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, France)
The energetics of molecular gas in active phases of galaxy evolution

April 21, 12:00 hr: Dr. Montse VILLAR-MARTIN (Centro de Astrobiologia, Madrid, Spain)
VLT-FORS2 imaging and spectroscopic study of SDSS type 2 quasars at z~0.3-0.6

April 29, 12:00 hr: Dr. Raphael GOBAT (CEA, Paris, France)
Galaxy assembly at the dawn of cluster formation


March

March 1, 12:00 hr: Ms. Crystal BRASSEUR (MPI fuer Astronomie, Heidelberg)
The Sizes and Spatial Distribution of the Smallest Galaxies

March 2, 14:00 hr: Dr. Sylvestre LACOUR (LESIA, Paris, France)
Aperture masking: Data reduction workshop

March 2, 16:00 hr: Dr. Fabio BRESOLIN (IfA, Hawaii)
Musings on galactic abundance gradients

March 3, 12:00 hr: Dr. Sylvestre LACOUR (LESIA, Paris, France)
First Science Grade Results of the Aperture Masking Mode of NaCo

March 16, 16:00 hr: Dr. Dave JONES (ESO, Chile)
CSI: PN - Circumstellar Investigation: Planetary Nebula

March 17, 12:00 hr: Dr. Robert SORIA (University of Sydney, Australia)
Powerful and wimpy microquasars

March 23, 12:00 hr: Dr. Mubdi RAHMAN (University of Toronto, Canada)
Understanding Galactic Star Formation: Young, Massive Star-Forming Complexes in the Milky Way

March 23, 16:00 hr: Dr. Pat HARTIGAN (Rice University, USA)
Fluid Dynamics of Stellar Jets in Real Time

March 24, 12:00 hr: Dr. Katie DODDS-EDEN (MPE, Garching, Germany)
What is behind the near-infrared and X-ray flares from Sgr A*?

March 25, 12:00 hr: Dr. Paolo MOLARO (INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Italy)
Like a rolling constant
PRESENTATION

March 29, 12:00 hr: Dr. Antonio DE UGARTE POSTIGO (Dark Cosmology Centre, Denmark)
GRBs in the ALMA era

March 30, 16:00 hr: Dr. Nuno SANTOS (Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto)
Astrophysical challenges to the detection of other earths


February

February 10, 12:00 hr: Dr. Roberto DECARLI (MPIA)
Star formation at high-z: a stacking approach applied to mm data

February 11, 12:00 hr: Dr. Christophe PINTE (LAOG, Grenoble, France)
An in-depth look at protoplanetary  disks

February 16, 16:00 hr: Dr. Nora LUETZGENDORF (ESO, Garching)
Intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters

February 17, 12:00 hr: Dr. Jérémy LEBRETON (Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), France)
The debris disks as seen by Herschel

February 17, 14:00 hr: Dr. Tony MOFFAT (Dépt. de Physique, Univ. de Montréal)
The Most Massive Stars
(ESO/ALMA Colloquium)

February 18, 12:00 hr: Dr. Xavier BONFILS (Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), France)
Planets around M dwarfs: The Shortcut to Happiness

February 22, 12:00 hr: Dr. Bruno LEIBUNDGUT (ESO, Garching)
The surprising inner ejecta of SN1987A

February 23, 16:00 hr: Dr. Pasquier NOTERDAEME (CONICYT/CNRS Fellow, Universidad de Chile)
Neutral gas at high redshift

February 24, 12:00 hr: Dr. Thodori NAKOS (University of Ghent, Belgium)
Science with the James Webb Space Telescope



January

January 13, 16:00 hr: Dr. David BARRADO (CAB Centro de Astrobiologia LAEFF-INTA)
The Lambda Orionis Star Forming Region

January 24, 12:00 hr: Dr. Rene FASSBENDER (MPI, Germany)
Galaxy Clusters in the First Half of Cosmic Time

January 26, 12:00 hr: Dr. Rebeca GRELLMANN (Ludwig-Maximilians University, Germany)
Infrared-Interferometry of the massive YSO NGC 2264 IRS 1

January 26, 16:00 hr: Dr. Elizabeth TASKER (McMaster University)
Igniting the Galaxy: The evolution of the star-forming clouds in global galaxy disc simulations

January 28, 12:00 hr: Dr. Angela BONGIORNO (Max Planck Institute, Germany)
Host galaxies of AGN in the COSMOS field

January 31, 12:00 hr: Dr. Giacomo BECARI (ESO, Garching)
Observations of Blue Straggler: clues on the dynamical state of Globular Clusters