Seminars and Colloquia at ESO Garching

For ESO and ESO-related Conferences and Workshops in Europe and Chile please check the main Conferences and Workshops page.

November 2014

18.11.14 (Tuesday)
10:00, ESO room "Fornax", Star and Planet Formation seminar
"Spectral evolution of Hot Molecular Cores: synthetic spectra of COMs at sub-mm wavebands"
Rumpa Choudhury (MPE)
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"Spectral evolution of Hot Molecular Cores: synthetic spectra of COMs at sub-mm wavebands"

Rumpa Choudhury (MPE)

Abstract
Hot Molecular Cores (HMCs) are intermediate stages of high mass star formation and also known for their rich chemical reservoirs and emission line spectra at sub-mm wavebands. Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) such as Methanol (CH3OH), Ethanol (C2H5OH), Dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), Methyl formate (HCOOCH3) etc. produce most of these observed lines. The observed spectral feature of HMCs such as total number of emission lines, associated line intensities etc. are also found to vary with evolutionary stages. We developed various 3D models for hot cores guided by the findings of recent empirical and modeling studies of high mass star formation. We also simulated synthetic spectra of selected molecules at different evolutionary time-scales by consistently coupling the chemical evolution with radiative transfer. The spatio-temporal evolution of gaseous and grain surface abundances of these COMs due to varying physical conditions will be presented. I will show that these models reproduce the observed spectra of HMCs within the typical lifetime of hot cores. I will also discuss the advantage of using 3D models over the 1D models for estimating the physical parameters from observations. Finally, I will summarize the possible applications of these models to explore the physio-chemical evolutionary scenario during the initial stages of high-mass star formation using high resolution observations such as ALMA.
18.11.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"Deeper than Hubble: the MUSE 3D view of the Hubble Deep Field South"
Roland Bacon (CRAL - Observatoire de Lyon)
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"Deeper than Hubble: the MUSE 3D view of the Hubble Deep Field South"

Roland Bacon (CRAL - Observatoire de Lyon)

Abstract
I will present the results of an ultra-deep spectroscopic survey of the Hubble Deep Field South using MUSE. The data cube resulting from the 27 hours of integration covers one arcmin2 field of view at an unprecedented depth increasing the number of redshifts known in the region by an order of magnitude, up to 189 redshifts with 26 Ly-a emitting galaxies that are not even detected in the HST images down to magnitude 29.5. I will describe the overall sample properties and demonstrate the power of MUSE to perform deep field spectroscopy at comparable depth to the HST imaging deep-fields. I will discuss the promise of MUSE for future deep surveys of the Universe.
20.11.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"Gamma-ray bursts as probes of the ISM and star-formation at high-z"
Patricia Schady (MPE)
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"Gamma-ray bursts as probes of the ISM and star-formation at high-z"

Patricia Schady (MPE)

Abstract
It has long been recognized that the bright and simple afterglow spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make highly effective probes of the ISM within distant, star-forming galaxies. The imprint left by dust and gas absorption on GRB X-ray and optical afterglow spectra can be measured to a high level of accuracy, providing details on the ionisation state and location of absorbing material on sub-kpc scales. Despite significant progress in this field, there remain unresolved issues, such as the origin of the X-ray afterglow absorption 'excess', and discrepancies in the dust extinction derived from spectroscopic and photometric data. In this talk I will present results from a comprehensive study on the multi-wavelength attenuation of GRB afterglows, and highlight some of the principal outstanding issues to be addressed. A more controversial topic is the use of GRBs as probes to the cosmic star formation rate density. This area of research has received increased attention over the last few years, as more massive, dust-rich, and (super-) solar-metallicity host galaxies have come to light. I will summarise the latest developments within this field, and present ongoing work within our group to identify the relation between GRB host and other star-forming galaxy populations, and to use GRBs to study star formation at z>2.
25.11.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"Particle Physics meets Astrophysics: Astrophysical counterparts of IceCube Neutrinos"
Paolo Padovani (ESO)
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"Particle Physics meets Astrophysics: Astrophysical counterparts of IceCube Neutrinos"

Paolo Padovani (ESO)

Abstract
IceCube has recently reported the discovery of high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin, opening up the PeV (10^15 eV) sky. These observations are challenging to interpret on the astronomical side and have triggered a fruitful collaboration across particle and astro-physics. I will first describe the IceCube experiment and then, by using positional and energetic diagnostics, discuss plausible astronomical counterparts to the neutrino events. These include extragalactic sources, namely BL Lacertae objects, a sub-class of blazars, and Galactic pulsar wind nebulae. I will conclude by addressing the implications of the results and possible ways forward.
27.11.14 (Thursday)
16:15, MPA large seminar room E.0.11, Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"Searching for the origins of galaxy bimodality"
Vivienne Wild (University of St. Andrews, UK)
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"Searching for the origins of galaxy bimodality"

Vivienne Wild (University of St. Andrews, UK)

Abstract
Understanding how and why galaxies form and evolve is one of the most challenging problems in modern astrophysics. Our own galaxy, the Milky Way, shows order and structure, as do most massive galaxies in our local neighbourhood. Yet when we look to very distant galaxies they are disordered and chaotic. One leading theory for the origin of this transformation invokes gas-rich mergers, which trigger massive starbursts leading to bulge and supermassive black hole growth. I will start by reviewing the evidence for and against this scenario. I will then turn to the interesting case of post-starburst galaxies at 0<z<2. How many of these recently quenched descendents of massive starbursts could be the progenitors of modern day red ellipticals, and what fraction of red ellipticals could have been formed through the gas-rich mergers required to trigger such strong starbursts?

December 2014

04.12.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Adam Muzzin
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"(topic t.b.a.)"

Adam Muzzin

Abstract
(available soon)
11.12.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Jonathan Tan (University of Florida)
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"(topic t.b.a.)"

Jonathan Tan (University of Florida)

Abstract
(available soon)
18.12.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Julio Navarro
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"(topic t.b.a.)"

Julio Navarro

Abstract
(available soon)

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2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010