Seminars and Colloquia at ESO Garching

For ESO and ESO-related Conferences and Workshops in Europe and Chile please check the main Conferences and Workshops page.

April 2014

22.04.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"The EAGLE Universe"
Richard Bower (Durham University, UK)
Abstract
Close
"The EAGLE Universe"

Richard Bower (Durham University, UK)

Abstract
The EAGLE (Evolution and Assembly of Galaxies and their Environments) project is a suite of hydrodynamic simulations of the Universe. The simulations take into account the full range of baryonic physics, including metal dependent gas cooling, star formation, supernovae and black hole formation. The resolution of the simulations is sufficient to resolve the onset of the Jeans instability in galactic disks, allowing us to study the formation of individual galaxies in detail. At the same time the largest calculation simulates a volume that is 100 Mpc on each side, exploring the full range of galaxy environments from the isolated dwarves to rich galaxy clusters.

A key philosophy of the simulations has been to use the simplest possible sub-grid models for star formation, black hole accretion and feedback from supernovae and AGN. Efficient feedback is achieved without hydrodynamic decoupling of particles. The small number of parameters in these models are calibrated by requiring that the simulations match key observed properties of local galaxies. Having set the parameters using the local Universe, I will show that the simulations reproduce the observed evolution of galaxy properties extremely well. The resulting universe provides us with deep insight into the formation of galaxies and black holes. In particular, we can use the simulations to understand the relationship between local galaxies and their progenitors at higher redshift and to understand the role of interactions between galaxies and the AGN that they host. I will present an overview of some of the most important results from the project.
23.04.14 (Wednesday)
16:30, Cluster building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Universe Colloquium
"The safest routes to islands Beyond the Standard Model"
Francesco Riva (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne)
Abstract
Close
"The safest routes to islands Beyond the Standard Model"

Francesco Riva (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne)

Abstract
In the absence of direct discoveries, physics Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) can be parametrized by an effective field theory as an expansion in inverse powers of the New Physics scale. This expansion serves as a guide for precision searches. In fact, the leading term in this expansion coincides with the standard model: its symmetries and relations are well known and are being tested at colliders. In this talk Francesco will discuss the next order in the expansion, that parametrize the largest effects that can be expected from physics BSM. He will show that many relations persist, implying that not all the observables that we experimentally test are independent. For example, deviations in the differential distribution of h->Vff decays, are correlated with deformations of the couplings of vectors to fermions, that are already well measured at LEP at CERN.
24.04.14 (Thursday)
10:00, ESO room "Fornax", Star and Planet Formation Seminar
"Are ”Low Luminosity Objects” Young Protostars?"
Tien-Hao Hsieh (MPIfR, Bonn / National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan)
Abstract
Close
"Are ”Low Luminosity Objects” Young Protostars?"

Tien-Hao Hsieh (MPIfR, Bonn / National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan)

Abstract
Low Luminosity Objects (LLOs) are the faintest protostars with internal luminosity Lint < 0.2 Lo. The nature of Low Luminosity Objects is still unclear. Their low luminosities hints that they could be either very young, very low-mass, or even very young and low-mass protostars (i.e., proto-brown dwarfs). In addition, they could be at the quiescent stage of episodic accretion process. To examine whether LLOs are truly young protostars, we study the evolutionary status of 16 LLOs with radio observations. We used 12M telescope and Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) to observe N2D+ and N2H+ line emission, and derived the N2D+/N2H+ abundance ratio which has been argued to be an evolutionary indicator in the early stage. We further use RADEX, a non-LTE molecular radiative transfer code, to derive the properties of molecular cores, such as volume density (nH2) and kinematic temperature (Tkin) which are believed to increase as a protostellar core evolves. We therefore study the relation between these age indicators and N2D+/N2H+ and our results suggest that most of our target LLOs are likely to be extremely young protostars.
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"Archaeology of Exo-Terrestrial Planetary Systems"
Jay Farihi (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge)
Abstract
Close
"Archaeology of Exo-Terrestrial Planetary Systems"

Jay Farihi (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge)

Abstract
We now stand firmly in the era of solid exoplanet detection via Kepler and other state of the art facilities. Yet the empirical characterization of these most intriguing planets is extremely challenging. Transit plus radial velocity information can yield planet mass and radius, and hence planet density, but the bulk composition remains degenerate and completely model-dependent. Currently, the abundances of a handful of exoplanet atmospheres can be estimated from transit spectroscopy, or observed directly via spectroscopy, but probing only the most tenuous outer layers of those planets.

Fortunately, as demonstrated by Spitzer and complementary ground-based observations, debris disk-polluted white dwarfs can yield highly accurate information on the chemical structure of rocky minor planets (i.e. exo-asteroids), the building blocks of solid exoplanets. The white dwarf distills the planetary fragments, and provides powerful insight into the mass and chemical structure of the parent body.

This archaeological method provides empirical data on the assembly and chemistry of exo-terrestrial planets that is unavailable for any planetary system orbiting a main-sequence star. In the Solar System, the asteroids (or minor planets) are leftover building blocks of the terrestrial planets, and we obtain their compositions - and hence that of the terrestrial planets - by studying meteorites. Similarly, one can infer the composition of exo-terrestrial planets by studying tidally destroyed and accreted asteroids at polluted white dwarfs.

I will present ongoing, state of the art results using this unconventional technique, including the recent detection of terrestrial-like debris in the Hyades star cluster, as well as the detection of water-rich planetesimals that may represent the building blocks of habitable exoplanets.
29.04.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"The maturing stellar populations of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies"
Antonio Hernan-Caballero (Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Spain)
Abstract
Close
"The maturing stellar populations of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies"

Antonio Hernan-Caballero (Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Spain)

Abstract
Comparative studies of the restframe colours of active and inactive galaxies have shown no clear differences when the stellar mass-dependency of the AGN fraction is taken into account. This is in contrast to the observation of a lower frequency of AGN in quiescent galaxies, and specific star formation rates in AGN hosts that are comparable to those in star-forming galaxies at the same redshift. In this talk I will show recent results from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS) that provide an interpretation of these two apparently contradictory observations.

May 2014

08.05.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Omer Blaes
Abstract
Close
"(topic t.b.a.)"

Omer Blaes

Abstract
(available soon)
13.05.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"The Hot Horizontal Branch Stars in NGC 288 - Confusion, Diffusion and Why You should never Give Up!"
Sabine Moehler (ESO)
Abstract
Close
"The Hot Horizontal Branch Stars in NGC 288 - Confusion, Diffusion and Why You should never Give Up!"

Sabine Moehler (ESO)

Abstract
In my talk I will present the analysis of medium-resolution spectra of hot horizontal branch stars in the metal-poor globular cluster NGC 288. Equally important I will describe the pitfalls we encountered before arriving at our final results. In order not to spoil the talk no further details are given here.
15.05.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
George Chartas
Abstract
Close
"(topic t.b.a.)"

George Chartas

Abstract
(available soon)
20.05.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Lunch Talk
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Sebastien Muller (Onsala)
Abstract
Close
"(topic t.b.a.)"

Sebastien Muller (Onsala)

Abstract
(available soon)
22.05.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Pierre Kervella (LESIA, Observatoire de Paris)
Abstract
Close
"(topic t.b.a.)"

Pierre Kervella (LESIA, Observatoire de Paris)

Abstract
(available soon)
27.05.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"The astrophysics of the PLATO space mission"
Malcolm Fridlund (DLR)
Abstract
Close
"The astrophysics of the PLATO space mission"

Malcolm Fridlund (DLR)

Abstract
(available soon)

Future Talks

Choose your preferred calendar format to stay informed

Past Talks

(partly with videos)

2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010

ESO