Messier 100 and Supernova SN 2006X

Similar in appearance to our own Milky Way, Messier 100 is a grand spiral galaxy that presents an intricate structure, with a bright core and two prominent arms. The galaxy harbours numerous young and hot massive stars as well as extremely hot regions of ionised hydrogen. Two smaller arms are seen emerging from the centre and reaching towards the larger spiral arms. The galaxy, located 60 million light-years away, is slightly larger than the Milky Way, with a diameter of about 120,000 light-years. A supernova was discovered in M100 on 4 February 2006. Named SN 2006X, it is the 5th supernova to have been found in M100 since 1900. This image is based on data acquired with the 1.5 m Danish telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile, through three filters (B: 1390 s, V: 480 s, R: 245 s). The supernova is the brighter of the two stars seen just to the lower right of the galaxy centre.

Credit:

ESO/IDA/Danish 1.5 m/R. Gendler, J.-E. Ovaldsen, C. C. Thöne and C. Féron

About the Image

Id:eso-m100
Type:Observation
Release date:3 December 2009, 23:18
Size:1879 x 1955 px

About the Object

Name:Messier 100, SN 2006X
Type:• Local Universe : Galaxy : Type : Spiral
• X - Galaxies
• X - Stars
Distance:50 million light years
Constellation:Coma Berenices

Image Formats

Large JPEG
702.5 KB
Screensize JPEG
195.3 KB

Wallpapers

1024x768
205.4 KB
1280x1024
313.6 KB
1600x1200
432.2 KB
1920x1200
503.5 KB
2048x1536
642.1 KB

Coordinates

Position (RA):12 22 52.14
Position (Dec):15° 49' 28.17"
Field of view:12.38 x 12.88 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 45.2° left of vertical

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
B
433 nmDanish 1.54-metre telescope
DFOSC
Optical
V
544 nmDanish 1.54-metre telescope
DFOSC
Optical
R
648 nmDanish 1.54-metre telescope
DFOSC

 

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