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SN 1996cr in Circinus Galaxy

This composite image shows the central regions of the nearby Circinus galaxy, located about 12 million light years away. Data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is shown in blue and data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space telescope is shown in yellow ("I-band"), red (hydrogen emission), cyan ("V-band") and light blue (oxygen emission). The blue source near the lower right hand corner of the image is the supernova SN 1996cr, that has finally been identified over a decade after it exploded. The supernova was first singled out in 2001 as a bright, variable object in a Chandra image, but it was not confirmed as a supernova until years later, when clues from a spectrum obtained with ESO's Very Large Telescope led the team to start the real detective work of searching through data from 18 different telescopes, both ground- and space-based, nearly all of which was in the archives. SN 1996cr is one of the nearest supernovae in the last 25 years.

Credit:

X-ray (NASA/CXC/Columbia/F.Bauer et al); Visible light (NASA/STScI/UMD/A.Wilson et al.)

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About the Image

Id:eso0832a
Type:Observation
Release date:25 September 2008
Related releases:eso0832
Size:2400 x 1999 px

About the Object

Name:Circinus Galaxy
Type:• Local Universe : Star : Evolutionary Stage : Supernova
• Local Universe : Galaxy : Type : Spiral
• X - Galaxies
• X - Stars
Distance:13 million light years
Constellation:Circinus

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Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
X-ray Chandra X-ray Observatory
Optical
OIII
502 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
V
547 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
H-alpha
Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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